Saturday, July 01, 2006


Sketches of Quebec City (Part Two)

In 1759, the British and French forces fought the a definitive battle on the Plains of Abraham. Early on a humid morning in 2006, I was just grateful for a place to let the boys wander safely and explore the world at their own pace for a while. Wide open spaces, sweeping vistas down the escarpment to the river, and sporadic canons - not the worst way to pass a bit of time.

Finally, with at least some of the boys' energy burned off, we manage to make our way into the walled old city. I finally understand why people rave about Quebec City. The cobblestone streets are narrow, winding, unpredictable. Centuries-old buildings crowd together, leaning into each other for support. Everything is an arm's reach from everything else. Windowboxes adorn every window, and containers overflowing with flowers stand sentry at most doorways. It is like something out of a fairytale.

We wander near the Chateau Frontenac, and make our way down to lower town on the funicular, a 127 year old elevatorish device with a panoramic view that descends the side of the escarpment at a 45 degree angle. It is, we are told, the only funicular of this kind in Canada. The boys and I discover 'funicular' is a funny word to say, especially if you say it out loud, several times in a row.

Continue reading Sketches of Quebec City with Part Three.